Tag: procurement

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The struggle to follow through on your corporate purpose

Category: Uncategorized

Posted by: Jo Seagrave / 16 January 2019

Digitalist Magazine by Alexandra van der Ploeg, Head of Corporate Social Responsibility, SAP

15th January 2019

The world’s population today has the most knowledge available to help us achieve a world of equality, where people treat others as they expect to be treated. All businesses, big or small, want to make money but they also want to share their successes and help others to achieve diversity and inclusion. But sometimes, it can be hard to find the right way to help make a difference because at the end of the day, you’ve got to get your work done to keep your customers, employees, and stakeholders happy.

What if there was a simple way for you to make an impact on society without taking away resources from your daily business? Social enterprises have become mature and well-established businesses, providing reliable and high-quality services through regular procurement processes to businesses big and small, helping them to meet their business targets. Social enterprises are businesses that trade to intentionally tackle social problems, improve communities, provide people access to employment and training, or help the environment. Using the power of the marketplace to solve the most pressing societal problems, social enterprises are commercially viable businesses existing to benefit the public and the community, rather than shareholders and owners.

Social entrepreneurs play an important role in combatting inequality – they reduce poverty, build food systems, celebrate diversity, promote Indigenous culture, meet health needs, create employment opportunities for those with disadvantages, deliver community owned energy and address environmental issues and social exclusion. Profit models vary between organizations.

If every business in the world engaged with just one social enterprise in its procurement process, the overall effect on the world could be enormous. The Social Enterprise World Forum is working to encourage corporations to engage with social enterprises and to help people to understand more, they’re providing a free online course, How Social Enterprises Enhance Corporate Supply Chains. The course features representatives from both big business, including Johnson & Johnson and PwC, as well as social enterprises who work with big business. Attendees can hear from both sides and see what experiences have been gained and how they can become involved.

I truly believe that this is the future – working together to meet our business goals and incorporating diverse suppliers can have an incredible impact on our world!

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How procurement will save the world

Category: Uncategorized

Posted by: Jo Seagrave / 19 December 2018

Forbes by Robin Meyerhoff, Brand Contributor, SAP

6th December 2018

In August, Microsoft made headlines by requiring its suppliers to implement paid parental leave policies. Any company that wants to sell goods and services to Microsoft must offer its employees a minimum of 12 weeks paid leave by this time next year.

This is one example of large companies that are pushing suppliers on more than just price point — going beyond financial costs to consider social and environmental costs as well. At the recent Social Enterprise World Forum (an annual event designed to encourage the growth of social enterprises) participants discussed how more sustainable procurement requirements adopted by large companies could positively impact profits, people and the planet.

Corporate and social enterprise panel at SEWF 2018 discussing social supply chains

Dr. Marcell Vollmer, SAP; Julian Hooks, Johnson & Johnson; Jeremy Willis, PwC; Adele Peek, Foundation for Young Australians and Philip Ullman, Cordant Group discuss benefits and reasons for engaging social enterprises in corporate supply chains

Johnson & Johnson, one of the largest healthcare companies globally, attended the event. Julian Hooks is the Chief Procurement Officer, Corporate Tier, at Johnson & Johnson. He said, “We try to make the world a healthier place one person at a time and we’re doing that in part through our procurement strategy.” To deliver on that promise, Johnson & Johnson prioritizes buying from suppliers that are women or minority-owned businesses.

According to Hooks, in 2017 the company spent 1.45 billion dollars with businesses owned by women or people of color. He believes, “to change the face of healthcare, you need to change the face of the supply chain. That’s what does good in society and makes an impact.” Since Johnson and Johnson operates in 165 companies and works with 70,000 suppliers around the world, it has the potential to significantly boost diversity amongst business leaders globally.

Technology Makes Social Procurement Easier Technology can also help promote goods and services offered by social enterprises to commercial businesses. That’s where SAP, a global software provider, has stepped in. Marcell Vollmer, Chief Digital Officer of SAP Ariba, spoke at Social Enterprise World Forum (SEWF) about how the Ariba Network (from SAP’s 2012 acquisition of e-procurement cloud vendor, Ariba) connects over 3.5 million companies around the world to socially responsible businesses.

“When we talk to procurement professionals, we see people trying to tackle supply chain issues such as slavery, poverty and diversity. But they are struggling because they lack visibility and data on their suppliers,” explains Vollmer. SAP Ariba provides that visibility and can track over 200 different criteria such as environmental performance, fair labor and business practices or diversity in management. This information allows companies to conduct risk assessments and rankings of potential vendors, which result in more ethical and sustainable supply chains.

Given that SAP Ariba connects over 3.5 million companies to exchange approximately 2.1 trillion dollars in commerce, it presents a huge opportunity for social enterprises to connect with a bigger market. And an easier way for companies to enact more sustainable business strategies by buying from socially responsible providers.

SAP is also developing an ecosystem of partners that helps companies find businesses with social purpose. For example, SAP Ariba has made headway eliminating products made by enslaved workers through its partnership with Made in a Free World by providing transparency into suppliers’ labor practices. It also works with organizations like ConnXus to promote supplier diversity by helping companies identify small, minority and women-owned sellers.

To learn more about how social enterprises can enhance corporate supply chains, register for a new massive open online course (MOOC) created by SAP and SEWF. The course begins January 22, 2019.

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Are you a social enterprise looking for new customers to work with? Or, maybe you’re looking to diversify your supply chain by working with social enterprises who positively contribute to solving social, economic, or environmental challenges?

If you said yes to either of the above questions, then we’ve got the perfect learning opportunity for you! There’s a free Massive Open Online Course, How Social Enterprises Enhance Corporate Supply Chains, starting from January 22, 2019 and you’re invited to join. All you need to sign up is a valid email address and all video units require just 20 minutes of your time to complete. You can learn at any time that suits you and on any device. Here’s how it works!

The course introduces you to a variety of corporate and social enterprise representatives, sharing their experiences and helping you find the right solution for your business. The course runs over a four-week period, so every Tuesday from January 22, there will be new content released. You’ll find five videos per week and they’re approx. 20 minutes each – you can watch them in one sitting or one a day. And if you have questions or would like to discuss the content, you can meet your peers and the content experts in the discussion forum.

If you’d like to earn a Record of Achievement at the end of the course, you can complete the weekly assignments. These are multiple choice tests that you can take any time throughout the week, but you must submit them before the weekly deadline (every Wednesday before 9:00am UTC).

If you can’t commit to completing the weekly assignments, don’t worry – you can dip in and out of the content at any point, choosing the topics that appeal most to you. After the course finishes on February 27, you can still access all of the course content – you won’t be able to create new discussions or take the weekly assignments but you can still benefit from the course content.

Ready to learn? Enroll today for free – just create an account with your email address and when it’s time to start, we’ll send you a reminder with some more information.

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